We Hide, God Seeks - Radical

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We Hide, God Seeks

Just like David had the temptation to hide when he sinned, we have a temptation to hide when we fall short. Yet, for those of us in Christ, we can know that God is pleased with us. This is not because we have measured up, but because of the perfect work of Christ on the cross.

  1. God sees me in the darkness and he will never forget me.
  2. God sees me from the beginning and he made me wonderfully.
  3. God sees me when I wrong him and he treats me graciously.

I am happy to open up God’s Word with you this morning, McLean Bible Church. I’m one of the pastors here and it is good to be with you. Before I jump in, I first want to say happy Memorial Day. Today we honor the many people who have died in our country so we can enjoy the freedoms we enjoy today. I am thankful.

If you have a Bible—and I hope you do—go ahead and open to Psalm 139. Before we jump in there, I want to start off with this: The great writer, Toni Morrison, wrote her first book—The Bluest Eye— in 1970 and it is not a pleasant read. It’s not a beach read. In fact it’s pretty hard to read as it follows a young girl named Pecola as she descends into madness because she’s unable to measure up to the false and narrow standards of beauty around her. To be beautiful was to have blue eyes and blond hair, but she could never have that no matter how much she wanted it. She was crushed psychologically and literally. She was crushed by the way she perceived other people perceiving her. I want to say to you today that we are not that much different than Pecola.

The weight of the eyes of other people, their expectations or standards for most of us, do one of two things. Either their standards crush us because we can’t meet them or we’re proud because we did. Either we try to rise to the heights of the standards others have for us or we’re crushed under the weight of expectations people have of us. You see, the eyes of other people affect us. And if they affect us so, here’s my question for you this morning: How are you affected by the way the God of the heavens and earth sees you?

Psalms 139 Reminds Us that Gods Standards are Infinitely High 

If we think other people’s standards are high and unattainable, what about God’s? His standards are infinitely high and He sees everything about us. He doesn’t just see the Instagram version of us; He sees the stuff we would never put out for public consumption. He sees all the stuff we would rather leave hidden. So let me ask again, how does the fact that we are fully within the sights of the all-seeing, holy God of the universe affect us? Psalm 139 shows us how it should affect us and that actually an all-seeing, holy God is good news. You see, in this Psalm the author—David—goes from dreading the all-seeing God to enjoying the presence of an all-seeing and holy God.

Before we dive into the meat of the sermon, I want to take a moment to read this text with you:

O LORD, you have searched me and known me! You know when I sit down and when I rise up; you discern my thoughts from afar. You search out my path and my lying down and are acquainted with all my ways. Even before a word is on my tongue, behold, O LORD, you know it altogether. You hem me in, behind and before, and lay your hand upon me. Such knowledge is too wonderful for me; it is high; I cannot attain it. Where shall I go from your Spirit? Or where shall I flee from your presence? If I ascend to heaven, you are there! If I make my bed in Sheol, you are there! If I take the wings of the morning and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea, even there your hand shall lead me, and your right hand shall hold me. If I say, “Surely the darkness shall cover me, and the light about me be night,” even the darkness is not dark to you; the night is bright as the day, for darkness is as light with you. For you formed my inward parts; you knitted me together in my mother’s womb. I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your works; my soul knows it very well. My frame was not hidden from you, when I was being made in secret, intricately woven in the depths of the earth. Your eyes saw my unformed substance; in your book were written, every one of them, the days that were formed for me, when as yet there was none of them.

How precious to me are your thoughts, O God! How vast is the sum of them! If I would count them, they are more than the sand. I awake, and I am still with you. Oh that you would slay the wicked, O God! O men of blood, depart from me! They speak against you with malicious intent; your enemies take your name in vain. Do I not hate those who hate you, OLORD? And do I not loathe those who rise up against you? I hate them with complete hatred; I count them my enemies. Search me, O God, and know my heart! Try me and know my thoughts! And see if there be any grievous way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting! This is the Word of the Lord. The fact that God sees us fully is something we can rejoice in. For the rest of this sermon, I’m going to first describe why we have a hard time accepting the fact that God seeing everything is good news. Then I’m going to take some time to give you reasons why we can rejoice in the God Who sees us. Before I do, let’s pray together.

Oh Father, we love You. We thank You that You are a good God; that You see everything about us, yet You love us anyway. Father, I pray as we hear Your Word preached this morning that we would not sit above Your Word as critics, but that we will sit beneath Your Word as servants, saying, “Father, whatever You tell me to do today, I will do it. Speak Lord, Your servant is listening.” And I speak these things in the name of Jesus. Amen.

The all-seeing gaze of God is something that God’s children can rejoice in.

Psalm 139 describes how the gaze and presence of God is something we cannot get away from We cannot hide from it. In the first half of this Psalm, David describes this phenomenon. In verse one, he says “Oh Lord, You have searched me and known me.” The word ‘search’ can have the sense of digging into. When I think about that, I think of an archeologist who unearths things that have been long hidden from the eyes of people. David is trying to say there is absolutely nothing hidden from the sight of God. There may be things in us that have been hidden from the sights of people, however before God it is all uncovered. He has excavated us and knows us fully.

David goes on to describe how God sees everything and the extent to which God sees everything. We see this from verses two through six. God knows the mundane things about you. He knows when you sit and when you rise. He knows every thought you have. He knows what you’re about to say. He knows it all; He knows everything about you. So here’s the question I have for you: How does David respond to this truth?

I believe David responds to this truth the same way we might respond to it. Take a moment and look at verses five and six. He says, “You hem me in behind and before, and lay Your hand upon me. Such knowledge is too wonderful for me; it is high; I cannot attain it.” We see two reactions from David right here that actually seem opposite from each other. On one hand, David says in verse five, “God, You hem me in behind and before.” When David says this, he’s not necessarily talking about a warm embrace. Most of the time when we see ‘hem’ in the Old Testament, it is a picture of an imposing army surrounding a city in order to attack it. It’s not a positive, warm and fuzzy feeling.

It seems that David is trying to say, “The holy and perfect God of the universe sees me and I’m in danger. I’m surrounded. There’s no escape.” But he says in verse six, “This is true, yet this truth is wonderful and beyond my ability to comprehend.” So which is it? I think David is going through something we all go through as well.

The all-seeing gaze of the holy God is both delightful and dreadful.

On one hand, I think we know this. Oh, how we desperately want someone to know us completely and to get us. How many times have we been around people in public and thought: “I wish these people got me; I wish they understood me; I wish they knew me”? It is comforting to be known by someone, but here’s the tension. As soon as we are known completely, we are vulnerable. If someone knows us completely, they know all the stuff that is not out there for public consumption. They know all the bad things we’ve done; all the things we would rather keep hidden. Add that to the fact that we’re talking about the perfect and holy God of the universe. His holy gaze is on us. He sees all our sin and we have the justified fear that God will crush us because of all the information He has on us. So because of all that, what do we do? We are tempted to hide. We actually see this temptation in David in this text. Look at verse seven: “Where shall I go from Your Spirit? Or where shall I flee from Your presence?” In other words, “God, I can’t stand Your gaze; I need to get away,” However, he quickly realizes there is no place to go. Look at the next couple of verses: “I can go anywhere in the universe and guess what? You’re still there. I can’t get away.” Just like David had the temptation to hide, we also have the temptation to hide.

Have you ever tried to play hide-and-go-seek with a toddler? I’m doing that a lot during this pandemic. Have you tried to play it with a child who does not understand the concept of hide-and-go seek? I remember first playing it with our oldest child about a year and a half ago. He did not understand the concept and it was rather sad. I would tell him to go hide, but rather than running somewhere to hide, he would shut his eyes and cover his face. Or when I would tell him to hide, he would grab a piece of clothing or a towel and put it over his head, not even covering up all the way. I wondered if he was thinking that because he can’t see me, then I can’t see him.

Let me tell you, we are a lot like my son in that way. If we just cover our eyes to the existence of God, thinking He can’t see us, then we can deny that He is even there. Or we think if we cover ourselves with our good deeds so God can’t see us, we’re just like my son in that our good deeds can’t fully cover us. The issue is that we can’t do enough good deeds to make God happy with us. He is holy. God sees all of us, including our sin. If we die like that, we have no hope.

Let me tell you, there is good news. We actually see a bit of it in verse ten where he talks about not being able to get away from God. Even if he goes to the recesses of the universe, God is there. He implies that he is tempted to hide, He says even if he runs, God will find him. Look at what God will do: “even there your hand shall lead me, and your right hand shall hold me.” Hold on! Time out! David is saying that the very same God Who hems him in and that he is tempted to run from is the same God Who will actually lead him and hold him? How does David know that when God finds him in his sin that God won’t crush him? Here’s the thing. David knows that God has provided a way of salvation. If you don’t know Jesus, God has done this for you as well. He takes all the information He has on us, including all the dirt that we have, then even though He would be perfectly within His rights to crush us, because He is a good and just God, He instead does what? He graciously guides and comforts us. How does He do that? Through the perfect work of Jesus Christ.

You may be watching today and thinking, “I don’t understand why you guys are there, why you’re singing, why this guy on my screen is yelling at me.” Well, let me tell you what this is all about. Everything that exists—you and me included—was created by a holy God for His glory. Instead of living for that purpose, everyone who exists actually sins against God. We rebel against Him. We decide we know the way to joy and eternal life better than He does. We decide to go our own way and because of that, the holy and just wrath of an all-seeing God of the universe is upon us. Just like our parents, Adam and Eve, we try to hide. We hide behind our achievements, thinking we can impress God. We hide behind our busyness, thinking we can ignore God. We even hide behind our good works, thinking we can satisfy God. But all the while we stand condemned before Him because we can’t do enough.

Psalms 139 Shows Us that We Find Joy in God the Son

So here’s the good news for you today. This is why you can find joy in an all-seeing God. God the Father has sent God the Son for us. God provided a way that we can go from condemned to being His beloved children. God provided a way for us to not be crushed, but instead to be led and guided by Him. He sent His Son for that. His Son Jesus Christ came and lived a perfect life of obedience. He came and died a death on the cross, in our place, for our sin. So if you humbly bring your sin to Jesus, confessing that sin, He will forgive you and will not crush you. If you believe that Jesus’ perfect obedience and perfect sacrifice on the cross is for you, then you can know that when the God of the universe looks at you He will not crush you. He will forgive you. As verse ten says, He will guide and hold you.

Listen to me. In Christ you can know that God is pleased with you, not because you measure up, not because you get it all right, but because of the perfect righteousness of Jesus Christ. Jesus paid for all of your sin, therefore you don’t have to walk in guilt and shame anymore. He covers all of it.

Have you ever been in a grocery store and when they rang up all your items, you quickly realized you were unable to pay for them? I’ve been there. You may not know this, but there used to be a day before credit cards when you had to carry cash. So I was carrying cash, went to the register, they rang up a lot of items, they told me how much it cost, then I checked my pockets. I had forgotten my wallet and was incredibly embarrassed because I could not pay for what was in front of me and there was a long line behind me.

Let me tell you that Jesus Christ has never felt that way. You may be looking at this screen and thinking, “You don’t know how much I’ve done, Eric. How do I know that Jesus has paid for all my sin? I’ve done too much to be forgiven.” Hear this truth today. James 4:6 has this little verse that says, “But he gives more grace…” Do you know what this means? This means that no matter how much baggage you have or how much you’ve done, when Jesus goes to the proverbially cash register and sees the price tag for your sin, He doesn’t flinch like I did. He doesn’t check His pockets. He doesn’t say that’s too much. So when it comes to paying for your sin, no matter how much it is, do you know how much grace God has to pay for your sin? James 4:5 tell us He has more. So what does that mean? When you humbly come to Jesus with your sin, know that His spilt blood will more than pay for it. Will you trust in Him?

You may be a follower of Jesus, but do you believe this truth? How would your life be different if you truly knew that the holy God of the universe sees you and that instead of crushing you, He delights in you. How might your life be different? I know one way your life would be different. You would rejoice always. I want to quickly give you three reasons you have to rejoice today in an all-seeing God. Here’s the first reason.

I can rejoice because God sees me in the darkness and will never forget me.

Look at Psalm 139:11—12:

If I say, “Surely the darkness shall cover me,

and the light about me be night,”

even the darkness is not dark to you;

the night is bright as the day,

for darkness is as light with you.

These two verses describe that the darkness you are tempted to believe will hide you is no match for the light of God’s presence.

I have a friend who went to Iceland a couple years ago. Nobody told him about the night time there and how long the sun stays out. He was surprised. He returned and told me that when it was time to go to sleep it looked like mid-day outside. Needless to say he was shocked. At the time he expected to be under the cover of darkness, he actually experienced the presence of light.

I share this to say that if you’re a believer in Jesus Christ, you can be delightfully shocked that God brings light when you expect darkness. Because God sees all your sin, you cannot hide from Him in that God sees all of you. You cannot hide from God in the darkness of your sin. In the same way, the darkness of your suffering cannot hide you from God. The darkness of your sin is no barrier for God to reach you. The darkness of your suffering is no barrier for the presence of God to reach you.

I want to be clear here. I know under the sound of my voice this morning, there are many people who are going through a particularly dark time right now. You may have lost your job. You may have lost a loved one. You may be losing your health. You may be dealing with anxiety and worry. Let me tell you that in the darkness, you might be tempted to believe or even question if God sees you. Psalm 139 tells us that He is with you.

Let me show you something interesting. Look at verse 11: “If I say, ‘Surely the darkness shall cover me, and the light about me be night…’” The word for ‘cover’ is actually the same word used in Genesis 3:15—the first place where the gospel is actually announced. Here’s the backstory: Adam and Eve sin against God. They try to hide from Him. God goes and actually finds them and gives them words of hope. These are the words He gives them: “There will be an offspring of the woman who will come and crush or bruise the serpent’s head—the enemy.” We know now that promise was fulfilled in Jesus Christ. That word for crush or bruise in Genesis is the same word for cover in Psalm 139:11.

Psalms 139 Reminds Us that Jesus Crushed Darkness 

Where am I going with this? Psalm 139:11 could be rendered that the darkness will crush me. How often do we think that the darkness we are going through, the darkness of our sin or suffering, will crush us? Genesis 3:15 tells us that the darkness cannot crush us because Jesus crushed the darkness. Jesus crushed the enemy’s head. God sees you in the darkness and because of that, He is with you in it now. Because there was a day at Calvary when Jesus crushed the serpent’s head, there will surely be a day in your future when the darkness you are experiencing right now will flee forever.

So what’s my encouragement to you today? Because God sees you in the darkness right now and there will be a day when He will make the darkness flee forever, I want to encourage you to hold on today. Hold on. There is hope. God is with you now and there will be a day when He wipes away every single tear. There will be no more sickness, death or sin. We will live in eternity with Jesus forever. Hold on!

I can rejoice because God sees me from the beginning.

Here’s my second point. Not only does God see us in our darkness and will never forget or leave us, God sees us from the beginning. He wonderfully made us. Look at verses 13-18. The Psalmist David talks about the wonder of being made by God. He says in verse 13, “For you formed my inward parts; you knitted me together in my mother’s womb. I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your works; my soul knows it very well.”

I love this truth because there is a God in heaven Who not only saw you in the beginning, but He was hands on. He formed you in the womb. Because of that, the assurance that you can have right now where you sit is that the God of heaven Who formed you does not produce mistakes. You are not a mistake. David said in verse 14 that because God made him that he is “fearfully and wonderfully made.” He says, “I’m a work of God and my soul knows it very well.”

David knew he was a wonderful work of God. Do you? Does your soul know that you are fearfully and wonderfully made? These verses have incredible meaning for me. Just last week, my youngest son turned two years old. As we were thinking back about his life, we were reminded about his life in the womb. When my wife was pregnant with him, we went to the doctor’s office for a routine ultrasound. The technician actually attends this church; she’s an amazing woman. She was doing the ultrasound and pointed out that something did not look right. After that ultrasound, a number of doctors agreed with her. The problem was that his legs were not right; they were stuck in one place and misshaped. They were malformed. The doctors were confused about what condition he had, but one doctor was pretty certain about the condition. I remember asking that doctor, “Can you tell us what his long-term quality of life will be? Are there studies of other children who had this syndrome?” The doctor said, “We can guess here, but we don’t have a lot to go on because most of the parents who had children who presented the same symptoms that your child presents chose to terminate the pregnancy.”

Fast forward a few months when our son was born. I remember the doctor picking him up and handing him to me. Yes, his legs were deformed, but as I was holding him, he laid back in my arms and the first words I whispered to him came from Psalm 139:14. I said, “Son, you are fearfully and wonderfully made. You are a wonderful work of God and I pray that your soul knows it very well.” You see, I said this to my son because I know he lives in a world in which he needs to hear this truth.

There are many of you who need to hear this truth too. Your soul needs to know this truth very well. Why? Because we live in a world in which the shade of your skin, the texture of your hair, your body build or even some kind of physical handicap would cause the world to say something is wrong with you; you are not made wonderfully. If you are not careful, you could be shaped more by the words of the world than by the words of the God Who shaped you. We could easily be like Pecola in The Bluest Eye, shaped by the false and narrow standards of beauty in the world rather than the Author of creation Who looks at you and calls you wonderful.

My prayer for you today is that this truth of an all-seeing God will release you from feelings of inferiority, knowing that He looks at you and calls you wonderful. To the person confined to a wheelchair this morning, I want to tell you that God formed you and that you are fearfully and wonderfully made. To the person who thinks that because of the shade of your skin or the texture of your hair that you are undesirable, hear me loud and clear right not. God made you; He knit you together in your mother’s womb. You are fearfully and wonderfully made. To the person who looks in the mirror and can’t stand what they see, to the mother of children who see what having children has done to her body and she can’t stand to look in the mirror, I want you to hear me loud and clear. God sees you. To the mothers out there, know that the very same God Who knit that child together in your womb is the same God who also declares to you that you are fearfully and wonderfully made, too.

Who you are, your body and what you look like did not catch God by surprise. He knit you together and when He looks at you like He does, do you know what He yells out? Wonderful. Wonderful! You were wonderful from the beginning and verse 16 says that God will see you until the end:

Your eyes saw my unformed substance;

in your book were written, every one of them,

the days that were formed for me,

when as yet there was none of them.

Listen to this. God formed you in the womb from the very beginning and He will continue forming your days until the very end. Do you know what means for you? You have a purpose.

I can rejoice because God sees me when I wrong Him and He treats graciously.

I want you to take moment to look at verses 19-24. In 19-22, David expresses his desire for God to deal with his enemies. I wish I had more time to spend there; I’ll lightly touch it at the end, but I want you to focus now on verses 23-24, where says this:

Search me, O God, and know my heart!

Try me and know my thoughts!

And see if there be any grievous way in me,

and lead me in the way everlasting!

David does something here that is unthinkable. He asks the holy God of the universe to search him. David goes from hiding from God to coming out with his hands up, saying, “God, search me. See if there’s any grievous way in me.” This is bold. David did some grievous things to say the least. If you know anything about him, you know that David committed adultery and murdered. Just like there were grievous areas in David’s life, we all know deep down inside there are areas of our lives that are grievous as well. Here’s the thing. How was David able to do this? He was able to come out with his hands up because he knew he was one of God’s people and knew that when God saw his sin, God would not respond by casting him out but by leading him in the way everlasting.

Listen to me this morning. To be a child of God is to have the assurance that you can come out of hiding. You don’t have to hide anymore; this is what confession is. We confess our sin to God, then we can come out from hiding and know that if God finds something in us that grieves Him that He won’t push us away in condemnation. Instead, He will gently lead us in the way everlasting because Jesus paid for our sin—past, present and future. It says if we confess our sin, He is faithful and just to forgive us (1 John 1:9). This is key for us.

I talk to a lot of people who struggle and wrestle with shame and guilt, even after they come to Jesus Christ. I’ve heard it put this way: The mark of a Christian is not that we never sin; the mark of a Christian is what we do when we sin. Do we cower from God in fear as if we’re still under His condemnation? Or do we acknowledge our sin quickly, knowing He will deal with us gently as His children?

Psalms 139 Calls Non-Believers to Trust God

Here’s the thing. If you don’t know Jesus, the Bible actually considers you an enemy of God, so then it is appropriate for you to hide from God in fear because His wrath is against you. David talks about his enemies in verses 19-22, but let me tell you this morning, here’s the good news of my life and this truth can be the same for you as well. God has always been in the business of taking His worst enemies and making them His beloved friends. I want to assure you today that you have the opportunity to go from enemy to beloved son or daughter of the living God. What do you need to do? You need to trust Him. 

As I close right now, I want to tell you a story of someone who learned that she can rejoice in the gaze of an all-seeing God. While Pecola in The Bluest Eye was crushed by the gaze of others, this is another woman who experienced grace in the gaze of Another. We actually see this woman in John 4. We call her the woman at the well. We come across this woman from Samaria and she has all this baggage and knows it. As a matter of fact, that affects the time in which she shows up at the well. She shows up at mid-day when it’s hottest all because she is scared and can’t stand the gaze of other people. She’s ashamed of what she’s done. However, Jesus Christ, God in the flesh, met her even when she was trying to hide from people. When He did, He showed her that He sees everything about her; everything she would rather remain hidden. In the same breath, He reveals Himself to be the Messiah Who would eventually come to die in order to save her. He does not condemn her; He does not run from her junk. He deals gently with her. So what does she do? She actually runs away, not in fear but to tell other people about Him. This woman says in John 4:39, “Come and see a man Who told me all that I ever did.” You see, she rejoices because the One Who saw everything about her did not push her away, but drew her close.

This same God Who met this woman of Samaria in the very place she was trying to hide will meet you in the place where you are trying to hide. He sees everything about you and is willing to accept you as you are. Jesus does not accept fake versions of us; He accepts what is real about us. If we come to Him with our sin, He is willing to fully accept us. He promises to take you as you are, but He won’t leave you as you were. He promises to make you into something better than you can ever imagine.

So rejoice today. God sees you fully and loves you endlessly. I pray that you will believe that. Let’s pray.

Father, we thank You so much for the truth of Psalm 139, that You have searched us and that You have known us. While we are tempted to hide from You and from each other, we are fully in Your sites. Father, thank You that we can move from objects of your condemnation to objects of Your grace and mercy in Christ. Thank You for the finished work of Jesus on the cross. I pray that we will live like the truth that we’ve just proclaimed in Psalm 139. Father, we love you and I pray these things in the name of Jesus. Amen.

How can we apply this passage to our lives?

Question 1

When you think about the omniscience of God, are you comforted or afraid?

Question 2

When you sin, do you find yourself running towards God or away from Him?

Question 3

Why do you think it is so easy to run from God?

Question 4

Do you find it difficult to remember that Jesus has crushed the darkness?

Question 5

Do you struggle to believe that God has made you wonderfully and purposefully?

 

What does the passage say?

Psalm 139

O Lord, you have searched me and known me! You know when I sit down and when I rise up; you discern  my thoughts from afar. You search out my path and my lying down and are acquainted with all my ways.  Even before a word is on my tongue, behold, O Lord, you know it altogether. You hem me in, behind and  before, and lay your hand upon me. Such knowledge is too wonderful for me; it is high; I cannot attain it.  Where shall I go from your Spirit? Or where shall I flee from your presence? If I ascend to heaven, you are  there! If I make my bed in Sheol, you are there! If I take the wings of the morning and dwell in the uttermost  parts of the sea, even there your hand shall lead me, and your right hand shall hold me. If I say, “Surely  the darkness shall cover me, and the light about me be night,” even the darkness is not dark to you; the  night is bright as the day, for darkness is as light with you. For you formed my inward parts; you knitted me  together in my mother’s womb. I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your  works; my soul knows it very well. My frame was not hidden from you, when I was being made in secret,  intricately woven in the depths of the earth. Your eyes saw my unformed substance; in your book were  written, every one of them, the days that were formed for me, when as yet there was none of them. How  precious to me are your thoughts, O God! How vast is the sum of them! If I would count them, they are  more than the sand. I awake, and I am still with you. Oh that you would slay the wicked, O God! O men of  blood, depart from me! They speak against you with malicious intent; your enemies take your name in  vain. Do I not hate those who hate you, O Lord? And do I not loathe those who rise up against you? I hate  them with complete hatred; I count them my enemies. Search me, O God, and know my heart! Try me and  know my thoughts! And see if there be any grievous way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting!

The all-seeing gaze of God is something that God’s children can rejoice in.

Psalm 139:5–6

You hem me in, behind and before, and lay your hand upon me. Such knowledge is too wonderful for me;  it is high; I cannot attain it.

Psalm 139:7

Where shall I go from your Spirit, or where shall I flee from your presence?

Psalm 139:10

Even there, your hand shall lead me, and you right hand shall hold me.

God sees me in the darkness and he will never forget me.

Psalm 139:11 – 12

If I say, “Surely the darkness shall cover me, and the light about me be night,” even the darkness is not  dark to you; the night is bright as the day, for darkness is as light with you.

God sees me from the beginning and he made me wonderfully.

Psalm 139:13–14

For you formed my inward parts; you knitted me together in my mother’s womb. I praise you, for I am  fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your works; my soul knows it very well PSALM 139:16 …in  your book were written every one of them, the days that were formed for me, when as yet there was none  of them.

God sees me when I wrong him and he treats me graciously.

Psalm 139:23 – 24

Search me, O God, and know my heart! Try me and know my thoughts! And see if there be any grievous  way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting!

Eric Saunders is the Campus Pastor at the McLean Bible Church Arlington campus, having previously served in pastoral roles in Raleigh, North Carolina and in Hampton Roads, Virginia. He is married to Jenique and they have two children, Harry (Eli) and Roman.

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